Skip to main content

Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

Click "More / Share / Borrow" for each clip's source context and citation link. HTML5 compatible browser required

Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Marcia Coyle
Chief Washington Correspondent, The National Law Journal
KQED 06/25/2014
Coyle: …they (The Supreme Court) sometimes have very unusual coalitions when they divide on fourth amendment questions. But on this case, it seems like it wasn't hard for them, generally because of, as the Chief Justice explained, the amount of information that cell phones contain today. He went into great lengths describing what we keep on our cell phones today. In fact, he said, a search of a cell phone is a more significant invasion than a search of your home in terms of what you can find. He made a funny comment at the beginning of his opinion saying that cell phones have become is such a pervasive and insistent part of our daily lives that a martian who came to the united states might think that it was an important part of the anatomy.
Marcia Coyle
Chief Washington Correspondent, The National Law Journal
KQED 06/25/2014
Coyle: yes, he (Judge Roberts) said privacy has a cost and he noted this will have an impact on law enforcement's ability to fight crime, but did think the government's counterarguments here just didn't outweigh those privacy interests. He says law enforcement has technological tools that it can use, for example, if somebody locks the cell phone, they can put cell phones in these special bags now in order to keep the evidence in the cell phone and cell phone itself from remotely being wiped. So, you know, he just came down basically saying that the privacy interests here were so much stronger, and he even we want back to the founding of the United States -- the American revolution. He said the seeds of that revolution were in the colonist's hatred, antipathy for the general warrants the soldiers used to rummage through their homes.
Showing 1 through 2 of 2
Page 1